“This Is Going To Hurt”: a review of Adam Kay’s hilarious medical memoir
Book Reviews / British / comedy / nonfiction / The Latest

“This Is Going To Hurt”: a review of Adam Kay’s hilarious medical memoir


Bound2Books is no stranger to medical memoirs. I love reading books about the living and the dead and everything in between. If I can combine medicine with comedy, then we have a real winner on our hands which is the case for Adam Kay’s memoir/diary This Is Going to Hurt: Secret Diaries of a Junior … Continue reading

“Is There Still Sex In The City?”: A Review on love, lust, and life in the Big Apple
American / Book Reviews / nonfiction / The Latest

“Is There Still Sex In The City?”: A Review on love, lust, and life in the Big Apple


Is There Still Sex In The City? by Candace Bushnell is an exploration of love, lust, and digital dating after 50. How should older women, and men for that matter, navigate single life in a world that has vastly changed since they last dated. As more and more couples split, especially later on in life, … Continue reading

The Best and Worst of Celebrity Memoirs
African / American / Book Reviews / chicano / comedy / nonfiction / South African / The Latest

The Best and Worst of Celebrity Memoirs


In the last decade, there has been an explosion of celebrities writing memoirs and autobiographies. Within this celebrity genre, comedians and comedic actors and actresses are some of the most published. This is probably due to their ability to entertain and make people laugh. I, like many others, have been drawn to these memoirs and … Continue reading

“Queenie”: a review of Candice Carty-Williams’ novel about female mental health
Book Reviews / British / The Latest

“Queenie”: a review of Candice Carty-Williams’ novel about female mental health


NOTE: discussions about mental health and miscarriage Candice Carty-Williams’ novel Queenie is set in a London that is very different from other novels I have read set there. It is set in a London with racial tensions and diversity alongside gentrification and poverty. For me, Carty-Williams’ London is truer to the ‘real’ London I have … Continue reading

“When All Is Said”: a review of Anne Griffin’s knockout debut novel
Book Reviews / Irish / Opinion Pieces / reading / The Latest / Travel

“When All Is Said”: a review of Anne Griffin’s knockout debut novel


Note: plot spoilers and discussions of death by suicide. In February this year, I had the chance to go to Ireland for a long weekend. I’ve been threatening to visit Ireland for years and it was amazing to finally be able to make that happen. Ireland is full of amazing literary nooks and even the … Continue reading

“The Unwinding of the Miracle”: a memoir for anyone who has been touched by cancer
American / Book Reviews / nonfiction / The Latest

“The Unwinding of the Miracle”: a memoir for anyone who has been touched by cancer


NOTE: Contains discussions about terminal illness. This is the memoir of the year for me. I know it is a bold statement to make considering it is only March and there are nine more months still to go, but I just loved this memoir by Julie Yip-Williams. This memoir spoke to me on so many … Continue reading

“The Little Friend” by Donna Tartt: storyteller of a generation
American / Book Reviews / The Latest

“The Little Friend” by Donna Tartt: storyteller of a generation


I first found Donna Tartt’s writing through her 2014 Pulitzer Prize winning novel, The Goldfinch. I was completely blown away by her storytelling and character building that I went out and purchased her other two novels The Little Friend and The Secret History. I have not been let down by her writing and feel myself … Continue reading

Being Muslim in America: a review of Ayser Salman’s memoir “The Wrong End of the Table”
American / Book Reviews / comedy / nonfiction / The Latest

Being Muslim in America: a review of Ayser Salman’s memoir “The Wrong End of the Table”


Ayser Salman’s memoir The Wrong End of the Table is a story of awkward childhood-teen antics and trying to figure out who you are when you have so many different cultures pulling you in different directions. Salman arrives in the U.S. with her family after they leave fascist Iraq in the 1980s. Figuring out who … Continue reading

A review of “Maid”: we need to talk about the working poor
American / Book Reviews / nonfiction / Opinion Pieces / The Latest

A review of “Maid”: we need to talk about the working poor


Stephanie Land’s memoir comes at an extremely important time in the world’s social and political climate. The very existence of her memoir is in direct defiance of the shame and stigma surrounding poverty. When I saw this memoir appearing in my social media feeds I was extremely excited to know more from Land. Although her … Continue reading