Lizzie the grateful servant in “The Dictionary of Lost Words”: why do authors keep getting class horribly wrong?
Australian / Book Reviews / British / historical / The Latest

Lizzie the grateful servant in “The Dictionary of Lost Words”: why do authors keep getting class horribly wrong?


On the surface, this all seems good and well. Although, I want to take a closer look at the relationship Esme has with her servant, Lizzie. Esme is motherless, and Lizzie acts in many ways like an older sister and motherly figure all in one. This plot device of women who have lost their mothers and their fathers aren’t great at raising them is a bit tiring and overused for me. Although, I might just read too many books… Continue reading

A Review of Sally Vickers’ “The Gardener”: A novel about siblings, small country towns, and the power of gardening
Book Reviews / British / The Latest

A Review of Sally Vickers’ “The Gardener”: A novel about siblings, small country towns, and the power of gardening


After many twists and turns, two adult sisters, Margot and Halcyon also known as Hassie, find themselves living together in a rundown Jacobian house in Hope Wenlock – a small village in the Welsh marshes. The two sisters seem to be completely different. And their relationship is civil but also very cold at the beginning of the novel. The sisters, almost unbeknownst to themselves, want to reconnect. They just don’t know how to do it. Continue reading

Who Is Allowed Access to Education?: What Bri Lee’s “Who Gets To Be Smart” and Kazuo Ishiguro’s “Klara And the Sun” can tell us about equitable education
Australian / Book Reviews / British / nonfiction / Opinion Pieces / study / The Latest

Who Is Allowed Access to Education?: What Bri Lee’s “Who Gets To Be Smart” and Kazuo Ishiguro’s “Klara And the Sun” can tell us about equitable education


What does a nonfiction social commentary book from Australian writer Bri Lee have to do with a dystopian futuristic novel from Japanese-British author Kazuo Ishiguro? The short answer – A lot.
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The Endless Pursuit of Chasing Your Dreams: A book review of William Boyd’s “Trio”
Book Reviews / British / Scottish / The Latest

The Endless Pursuit of Chasing Your Dreams: A book review of William Boyd’s “Trio”


This article contains affiliate links. These links don’t cost anything extra for you, but if you click on the link and buy a book through these links I can make a very small commission. This helps me keep my tiny blog afloat. Trio by William Boyd has been one of those books that has grown … Continue reading

Book Review of “Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine” by Gail Honeyman: Loneliness, loss, and making friends
Book Reviews / British / The Latest

Book Review of “Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine” by Gail Honeyman: Loneliness, loss, and making friends


Disclosure: Sections of the blog may contain affiliate links. Clicking through for additional information or to make a purchase may result in a small commission. This helps keep this small independent blog going. The opening of Gail Honeyman’s novel Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine has a quote from Olivia Laing’s book Lonely City, which I … Continue reading

Review of Dr. Joshua Wolrich’s “Food Isn’t Medicine”: Ask yourself the hard questions about your relationship with food
Book Reviews / British / nonfiction / The Latest

Review of Dr. Joshua Wolrich’s “Food Isn’t Medicine”: Ask yourself the hard questions about your relationship with food


If you want to change your relationship with food then Wolrich’s book is not a bad place to start. He breaks down complex research practices to help you figure out how medical research is conducted and therefore what the results of each outcome mean. He also helps highlight some of the main misconceptions we have about diet and food. Continue reading

A Review of Ottessa Moshfegh’s “Eileen”: An Ode to Daphne Du Maurier’s “Rebecca”?
American / Book Reviews / British / feminism / The Latest

A Review of Ottessa Moshfegh’s “Eileen”: An Ode to Daphne Du Maurier’s “Rebecca”?


Disclosure: This page may contain affiliate links. Clicking through for additional information or to make a purchase may result in a small commission. I am a big fan of Ottessa Moshfegh’s writing. I have also reviewed her novel My Year of Rest and Relaxation which you can check out by clicking on the title. Moshfegh … Continue reading

Four Shakespearean-Era Tributes Hidden in Maggie O’Farrell’s Award Winning “Hamnet”
Book Reviews / British / historical / The Latest

Four Shakespearean-Era Tributes Hidden in Maggie O’Farrell’s Award Winning “Hamnet”


Disclosure: This page may contain affiliate links. Clicking through for additional information or to make a purchase may result in a small commission. Maggie O’Farrell won the Women’s Prize for Fiction in 2020 for Hamnet and if you have read her novel, it is easy to see why. It is not easy to take on … Continue reading

A Review of “Adults” by Emma Jane Unsworth: on- and offline life
Book Reviews / British / The Latest

A Review of “Adults” by Emma Jane Unsworth: on- and offline life


Disclosure: This page may contain affiliate links. Clicking through for additional information or to make a purchase may result in a small commission. This book has all the trappings of contemporary adult living from social media and phone obsessions including the ways in which life online complicates our relationships, especially female friendships. The characters are … Continue reading