“Anxiety: the missing stage of Grief”: a review and personal exploration of Claire Bidwell-Smith’s grief self-help book
American / Book Reviews / nonfiction / The Latest

“Anxiety: the missing stage of Grief”: a review and personal exploration of Claire Bidwell-Smith’s grief self-help book


When my father died in 2011, my whole world was flipped on its head. I have spent most of my 20s coming to terms with death, loss, and grief, and this is also evidenced in the types of books I have read throughout this time. This can be seen in my reviews of fiction works … Continue reading

Review of Sayaka Murata’s “Convenience Store Woman”: fitting into the capitalist ideal
Book Reviews / Japanese / The Latest / translation

Review of Sayaka Murata’s “Convenience Store Woman”: fitting into the capitalist ideal


I am a lover of Japanese literature. I studied Japanese in primary school (but it sadly is not one of the languages that stuck in my head), and I have had an affinity for Japanese culture, art, and food. When I came across Sayaka Murata’s work, Convenience Store Woman, I knew I had to get … Continue reading

Stepping outside your comfort zone with “Britt-Marie Was Here”: a review of Fredrik Backman’s novel
Book Reviews / swedish / The Latest

Stepping outside your comfort zone with “Britt-Marie Was Here”: a review of Fredrik Backman’s novel


Swedish author Fredrik Backman has become quite the buzz-worthy author of late with his books appearing all over my bookish social media feeds. His first novel, A Man Called Ove became extremely popular and soon after that his books have become a worldwide hit. I decided to pick Britt-Marie Was Here as my first Backman … Continue reading

“Pride & Prejudice & Passports”: a review of Corrie Garrett’s immigrant retelling of Jane Austen’s classic
American / The Latest / YA

“Pride & Prejudice & Passports”: a review of Corrie Garrett’s immigrant retelling of Jane Austen’s classic


I’ve read some modern re-tellings of classics that have just fallen flat. Sometimes classics are named classics because they are indeed just that: stories that transcend time. They shape our culture and understanding of the past. They also help us shape our future and in particular the way authors and readers write and engage with … Continue reading

The Best and Worst of Celebrity Memoirs
African / American / Book Reviews / chicano / comedy / nonfiction / South African / The Latest

The Best and Worst of Celebrity Memoirs


In the last decade, there has been an explosion of celebrities writing memoirs and autobiographies. Within this celebrity genre, comedians and comedic actors and actresses are some of the most published. This is probably due to their ability to entertain and make people laugh. I, like many others, have been drawn to these memoirs and … Continue reading

“On The Come Up” Review: a close look at racial tensions and gang violence in Angie Thomas’ new novel
African / American / Book Reviews / The Latest / YA

“On The Come Up” Review: a close look at racial tensions and gang violence in Angie Thomas’ new novel


On The Come Up is Angie Thomas’ second novel. Her first, The Hate U Give, was a runaway success and was also adapted for film. Thomas’ first novel was amazing and the outstanding reviews and its reception from around the globe are a testament to her writing abilities. With that kind of first-time success, producing … Continue reading

“When All Is Said”: a review of Anne Griffin’s knockout debut novel
Book Reviews / Irish / Opinion Pieces / reading / The Latest / Travel

“When All Is Said”: a review of Anne Griffin’s knockout debut novel


Note: plot spoilers and discussions of death by suicide. In February this year, I had the chance to go to Ireland for a long weekend. I’ve been threatening to visit Ireland for years and it was amazing to finally be able to make that happen. Ireland is full of amazing literary nooks and even the … Continue reading

Aging horror and Indigenous stories: a review of Stephen King’s “Pet Sematary”
American / Book Reviews / The Latest

Aging horror and Indigenous stories: a review of Stephen King’s “Pet Sematary”


Stephen King published his novel Pet Sematary in 1983, which makes the novel almost 40 years old. The plot hinges on a universal human desire: to beat death and to keep hold of the ones we love. However, like many novels and legends before it, bringing things back from the dead doesn’t always go as … Continue reading