“Pride & Prejudice & Passports”: a review of Corrie Garrett’s immigrant retelling of Jane Austen’s classic
American / The Latest / YA

“Pride & Prejudice & Passports”: a review of Corrie Garrett’s immigrant retelling of Jane Austen’s classic


I’ve read some modern re-tellings of classics that have just fallen flat. Sometimes classics are named classics because they are indeed just that: stories that transcend time. They shape our culture and understanding of the past. They also help us shape our future and in particular the way authors and readers write and engage with … Continue reading

“On The Come Up” Review: a close look at racial tensions and gang violence in Angie Thomas’ new novel
African / American / Book Reviews / The Latest / YA

“On The Come Up” Review: a close look at racial tensions and gang violence in Angie Thomas’ new novel


On The Come Up is Angie Thomas’ second novel. Her first, The Hate U Give, was a runaway success and was also adapted for film. Thomas’ first novel was amazing and the outstanding reviews and its reception from around the globe are a testament to her writing abilities. With that kind of first-time success, producing … Continue reading

Why can’t we just believe women?: A review of Abby Norman’s “Ask Me About My Uterus”
American / Book Reviews / feminism / nonfiction / Opinion Pieces / The Latest

Why can’t we just believe women?: A review of Abby Norman’s “Ask Me About My Uterus”


Disclaimer: unapologetic discussions about periods and diarrhea ahead. As soon as I saw this book appear as a new release in Goodreads, I put it on my TBR straight away. As someone who identifies as a woman who also has a uterus, this book spoke to me. I’ve struggled with painful and irregular periods my … Continue reading

Geography and Conversations About Race: a review of Reni Eddo-Lodge’s “Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People About Race”
Book Reviews / British / feminism / nonfiction / Opinion Pieces / The Latest

Geography and Conversations About Race: a review of Reni Eddo-Lodge’s “Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People About Race”


Talking about race is exhausting. It is emotionally draining, stressful, awkward, painful, scary, and sometimes really dangerous. To have a conversation about race, or any hard topics like gender, sexuality, and class, requires a level of vulnerability that demands patience and practice. People from different sides of the spectrum often come to the table with … Continue reading

Interview fail: Han Kang author event at the Kaufleuten in Zurich
Opinion Pieces / reading / The Latest

Interview fail: Han Kang author event at the Kaufleuten in Zurich


I have been attending author events at the Kaufleuten in Zurich since I moved to Switzerland. They are great things for the community and I think they can encourage reading, multilingual boarder-crossing, and intellectual discussions about literature from around the world. I recently went to Han Kang’s talk/interview about her book, The Vegetarian. I have … Continue reading

Between Two Worlds: A review of “The Lonely Londoners”
Book Reviews / British / The Latest / Trinidad and Tobago

Between Two Worlds: A review of “The Lonely Londoners”


Sam Selvon’s The Lonely Londoners was written in the 1950s in a climate of change for the West Indies and Britain. As the British Empire slowly lost grip of its ‘acquired’ colonies, the British population found themselves with the confronting prospect of their colonial subjects ‘invading’ their white spaces and homeland. The Lonely Londoners tells … Continue reading

Can white people write about slavery? – A dicussion of Sue Monk Kidd’s “The Invention of Wings”
American / Book Reviews / historical / Opinion Pieces / The Latest

Can white people write about slavery? – A dicussion of Sue Monk Kidd’s “The Invention of Wings”


I just finished reading The Invention of Wings by Sue Monk Kidd. This book was actually suggested by the book club I am in, and so I started to read it without much knowledge of the author or the real story of the Grimké sisters, Sarah and Angelina. To be honest, I was not even … Continue reading