Making Sense of Loneliness: a review of Olivia Laing’s “The Lonely City”
Book Reviews / British / nonfiction / The Latest

Making Sense of Loneliness: a review of Olivia Laing’s “The Lonely City”


After living in Switzerland for six years, I have been thinking a lot about loneliness and what it means for us humans. I have been thinking about whether loneliness is ever good for us? Are their ways that we could harness our lonely moments to learn more about ourselves? I have wondered about the difference … Continue reading

“Queenie”: a review of Candice Carty-Williams’ novel about female mental health
Book Reviews / British / The Latest

“Queenie”: a review of Candice Carty-Williams’ novel about female mental health


NOTE: discussions about mental health and miscarriage Candice Carty-Williams’ novel Queenie is set in a London that is very different from other novels I have read set there. It is set in a London with racial tensions and diversity alongside gentrification and poverty. For me, Carty-Williams’ London is truer to the ‘real’ London I have … Continue reading

“The Unwinding of the Miracle”: a memoir for anyone who has been touched by cancer
American / Book Reviews / nonfiction / The Latest

“The Unwinding of the Miracle”: a memoir for anyone who has been touched by cancer


NOTE: Contains discussions about terminal illness. This is the memoir of the year for me. I know it is a bold statement to make considering it is only March and there are nine more months still to go, but I just loved this memoir by Julie Yip-Williams. This memoir spoke to me on so many … Continue reading

Being Muslim in America: a review of Ayser Salman’s memoir “The Wrong End of the Table”
American / Book Reviews / comedy / nonfiction / The Latest

Being Muslim in America: a review of Ayser Salman’s memoir “The Wrong End of the Table”


Ayser Salman’s memoir The Wrong End of the Table is a story of awkward childhood-teen antics and trying to figure out who you are when you have so many different cultures pulling you in different directions. Salman arrives in the U.S. with her family after they leave fascist Iraq in the 1980s. Figuring out who … Continue reading

Asian Invisibility In Western Literature: a review of Ann Y. K. Choi’s “Kay’s Lucky Coin Variety”
Book Reviews / Canadian / Opinion Pieces / reading / The Latest / YA

Asian Invisibility In Western Literature: a review of Ann Y. K. Choi’s “Kay’s Lucky Coin Variety”


I am going to cut to the chase on this review. Like the title suggests, there is a problem with the way that Asian literature is represented, or to be more precise its lack of representation, in the Western world. Many scholars and teachers have suggested to me over the years that Asian literature cannot … Continue reading

Fluid Identity: what it means to be Bharati Mukherjee’s “Jasmine”
American / Book Reviews / The Latest

Fluid Identity: what it means to be Bharati Mukherjee’s “Jasmine”


“We murder who we were so we can rebirth ourselves in the image of our dreams.” (29) This is, for me, the most powerful sentence in Bharati Mukherjee’s Jasmine. In this one sentence it summarises the story of the novel by embodying the nature of transcontinental lives and living. The main protagonist in Mukherjee’s novel … Continue reading