A Review of “Such A Fun Age”: talking about white fragility in literature
African / American / Book Reviews / feminism / The Latest

A Review of “Such A Fun Age”: talking about white fragility in literature


Disclosure: This page may contain affiliate links. Clicking through for additional information or to make a purchase may result in a small commission. I loved Such A Fun Age. This book was so easy to read. It had me laughing and cringing from beginning to end. It has been a while since I couldn’t put … Continue reading

A Review of “Adults” by Emma Jane Unsworth: on- and offline life
Book Reviews / British / The Latest

A Review of “Adults” by Emma Jane Unsworth: on- and offline life


Disclosure: This page may contain affiliate links. Clicking through for additional information or to make a purchase may result in a small commission. This book has all the trappings of contemporary adult living from social media and phone obsessions including the ways in which life online complicates our relationships, especially female friendships. The characters are … Continue reading

‘Literary ghettos’: how do we make sure diverse authors are included in mainstream publishing?
Book Reviews / Opinion Pieces / reading / The Latest

‘Literary ghettos’: how do we make sure diverse authors are included in mainstream publishing?


I am drawing today’s discussion inspiration from author Nesrine Malik and her amazing book (seriously, go read it now!) We Need New Stories. In her chapter entitled “The Myth of the Reliable Narrator”, Malik brings up the question if and how we should judge authors by their writing. More specifically, are authors allowed to write … Continue reading

A review of Susan Fowler’s memoir “Whistle Blower”: dealing with discrimination at work
American / Book Reviews / feminism / nonfiction / The Latest

A review of Susan Fowler’s memoir “Whistle Blower”: dealing with discrimination at work


I picked this memoir because I wanted to read and learn more about other women’s experiences with workplace discrimination. It is something I have personally experienced, and to be honest, it took years for me to come to terms with everything that happened. In reading Susan Fowler’s memoir, I felt, for the first time, truly … Continue reading

Review of Bae Suah’s “Untold Night and Day”: reflections and repetitions
Book Reviews / korean / The Latest

Review of Bae Suah’s “Untold Night and Day”: reflections and repetitions


I received Bae Suah’s novel as an Easter present. Considering we are all in lock-down at the moment, I welcomed a new book to read. I am a fan of Korean literature and was delighted to find out that Deborah Smith, the translator of Han Kang’s works, had worked on Suah’s translation into English. Suah … Continue reading

5 Things I Learnt About Life Thanks to Catherine Gray’s Book “The Unexpected Joy of the Ordinary”
Book Reviews / British / nonfiction / The Latest

5 Things I Learnt About Life Thanks to Catherine Gray’s Book “The Unexpected Joy of the Ordinary”


We find ourselves in weird times. Many of us have lost jobs. Others are trying to work from home while trying to look after children and family. Uncertainty is common place and it can be extremely easy to let that overwhelm you. Since Australia went into various stages of lock down I have fluctuated between … Continue reading

A Review of “The Dead Wife’s Handbook”: Moving through grief with the aid of fiction
Book Reviews / British / The Latest

A Review of “The Dead Wife’s Handbook”: Moving through grief with the aid of fiction


Disclosure: This page may contain affiliate links. Clicking through for additional information or to make a purchase may result in a small commission. I bought this book in the first few months after arriving in Switzerland at the giant English bookshop, that used to be located on the Bahnhofstrasse in Zurich. I was so intrigued … Continue reading

Reading Class: A review of Sally Rooney’s “Normal People”
Book Reviews / Irish / The Latest

Reading Class: A review of Sally Rooney’s “Normal People”


That’s money, the substance that makes the world real. There’s something so corrupt and sexy about it. Sally Rooney’s novel, Normal People, follows the lives of Connell and Marianne, two high school students from Sligo, West Ireland, and their journey’s of self discovery, love, and friendship. The story is built on the foundations of class … Continue reading