What do “The Code Breaker” & “Klara and the Sun”Have In Common?: Two books about the science and the fiction of gene editing
American / audiobooks / Book Reviews / British / nonfiction / The Latest

What do “The Code Breaker” & “Klara and the Sun”Have In Common?: Two books about the science and the fiction of gene editing

These questions are large and complex and cannot easily be answered, but I loved that Isaacson, like Ishiguro, asks us to address and think about these questions. It seems that many can agree that there is a possibility for gene editing to be used for the good of humanity, but where should we draw the line? Continue reading

A Review of Anna North’s “Outlawed”: “The Handmaid’s Tale” Meets the Wild Wild West
American / Book Reviews / fantasy / queer / The Latest

A Review of Anna North’s “Outlawed”: “The Handmaid’s Tale” Meets the Wild Wild West

This post contains affiliate links. If you purchase something through these links, I might make a very small commission. This helps me fund my blog. I was drawn to the cover of this book. I know what they say, you shouldn’t judge a book by its cover, but here we are. Outlawed by Anna North … Continue reading

Who Is Allowed Access to Education?: What Bri Lee’s “Who Gets To Be Smart” and Kazuo Ishiguro’s “Klara And the Sun” can tell us about equitable education
Australian / Book Reviews / British / nonfiction / Opinion Pieces / study / The Latest

Who Is Allowed Access to Education?: What Bri Lee’s “Who Gets To Be Smart” and Kazuo Ishiguro’s “Klara And the Sun” can tell us about equitable education

What does a nonfiction social commentary book from Australian writer Bri Lee have to do with a dystopian futuristic novel from Japanese-British author Kazuo Ishiguro? The short answer – A lot.
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Review of Rumaan Alam’s “Leave the World Behind”: What happens when we ignore nature?
American / Book Reviews / The Latest

Review of Rumaan Alam’s “Leave the World Behind”: What happens when we ignore nature?

This novel doesn’t give you the whole story of how this tragedy unfolds, but rather asks the question: what would you do in the first few days of the world’s end? How would you spend your time? Where would you go? What would you do? Continue reading

Review of “The Last Children of Tokyo”: dystopias as social commentary
Book Reviews / Japanese / The Latest / translation

Review of “The Last Children of Tokyo”: dystopias as social commentary

In Tawada’s world, the old don’t age or die, and the young are cursed with ill-health and short life-spans. Learn more about why this dystopian novel haunted me for months after I read it. Continue reading

A Review of “The Mother Fault”: Australian climate-change dystopia and the ‘Chinese bad guys’
Australian / Book Reviews / The Latest

A Review of “The Mother Fault”: Australian climate-change dystopia and the ‘Chinese bad guys’

Why is it that in our imagined fantasies, Asian countries are the bad guys? In light of the pandemic, I feel like this is even more important to talk about. What internal biases do we hold as a country if this is our default bad guy? Continue reading