Reading Class: A review of Sally Rooney’s “Normal People”
Book Reviews / Irish / The Latest

Reading Class: A review of Sally Rooney’s “Normal People”


That’s money, the substance that makes the world real. There’s something so corrupt and sexy about it. Sally Rooney’s novel, Normal People, follows the lives of Connell and Marianne, two high school students from Sligo, West Ireland, and their journey’s of self discovery, love, and friendship. The story is built on the foundations of class … Continue reading

Margaret Atwood’s “The Testaments”: did we need this sequel?
Book Reviews / Canadian / feminism / The Latest

Margaret Atwood’s “The Testaments”: did we need this sequel?


Margaret Atwood’s novel The Handmaid’s Tale was ground breaking when it was published. The story still resonates today, and the novel being turned into a T.V. series only further solidifies its importance in contemporary culture. When Margaret Atwood said she would follow up her novel with a sequel, The Testaments, I was pretty excited to … Continue reading

Review of Sayaka Murata’s “Convenience Store Woman”: fitting into the capitalist ideal
Book Reviews / Japanese / The Latest / translation

Review of Sayaka Murata’s “Convenience Store Woman”: fitting into the capitalist ideal


Disclosure: This page may contain affiliate links. Clicking through for additional information or to make a purchase may result in a small commission. I am a lover of Japanese literature. I studied Japanese in primary school (but it sadly is not one of the languages that stuck in my head), and I have had an … Continue reading

“Pride & Prejudice & Passports”: a review of Corrie Garrett’s immigrant retelling of Jane Austen’s classic
American / The Latest / YA

“Pride & Prejudice & Passports”: a review of Corrie Garrett’s immigrant retelling of Jane Austen’s classic


I’ve read some modern re-tellings of classics that have just fallen flat. Sometimes classics are named classics because they are indeed just that: stories that transcend time. They shape our culture and understanding of the past. They also help us shape our future and in particular the way authors and readers write and engage with … Continue reading

Escapism in Ottessa Moshfegh’s “My Year of Rest and Relaxation”
American / Book Reviews / The Latest

Escapism in Ottessa Moshfegh’s “My Year of Rest and Relaxation”


“Who hasn’t—sometime—wanted to escape? But from what? To where? And once we have arrived at the good place, is this the end of the desire to move? Or does it stir again, tempted by another image […]” p xi. Tuan,Yi-Fu Escapism. Yi-Fu Tuan describes the universal nature of our desire to escape in his geographical … Continue reading

Frankenstein’s monster by any other name: a comparative review of Ahmed Saadawi’s and Mary Shelley’s monsters
Book Reviews / Classic / The Latest / translation

Frankenstein’s monster by any other name: a comparative review of Ahmed Saadawi’s and Mary Shelley’s monsters


Disclosure: This page may contain affiliate links. Clicking through for additional information or to make a purchase may result in a small commission. Mary Shelley wrote her novel Frankenstein in 1818, which tells of the young scientist Victor Frankenstein who experiments with nature and biology to reanimate a human. Frankenstein’s monster is a combination of … Continue reading

Where is the body, where is the soul?: A review of Han Kang’s “Human Acts”
Book Reviews / korean / The Latest / translation

Where is the body, where is the soul?: A review of Han Kang’s “Human Acts”


Han Kang is one of my new favourite authors. Her latest novel, “The Vegetarian”, is such an intriguing look into the human psyche. Her novel, “Human Acts” was translated into English and published in 2014. A basic summary of the novel would be it explores the complex nature of loss, violence, and death that accompanied … Continue reading

The Fall of Serious Money: a review of John Lanchesters, “Capital”
Book Reviews / British / The Latest

The Fall of Serious Money: a review of John Lanchesters, “Capital”


Disclosure: This page may contain affiliate links. Clicking through for additional information or to make a purchase may result in a small commission. This book started off like a small rock slowing rolling down a snowy hill that eventually turns into an avalanche. What you are left with at the end of the novel is … Continue reading