“This Is Going To Hurt”: a review of Adam Kay’s hilarious medical memoir
Book Reviews / British / comedy / nonfiction / The Latest

“This Is Going To Hurt”: a review of Adam Kay’s hilarious medical memoir


Bound2Books is no stranger to medical memoirs. I love reading books about the living and the dead and everything in between. If I can combine medicine with comedy, then we have a real winner on our hands which is the case for Adam Kay’s memoir/diary This Is Going to Hurt: Secret Diaries of a Junior … Continue reading

“The F Word”: a review of Lily Pebbles’ book celebrating friendship
Book Reviews / British / nonfiction / The Latest

“The F Word”: a review of Lily Pebbles’ book celebrating friendship


Lily Pebbles’ is a lifestyle and beauty Youtuber from the U.K. Her first book, The F Word, is a celebration and personal exploration of contemporary friendships. I have always been interested in friendships, in particular female friendships, because when I moved to Switzerland in 2013 I saw massive shifts in who I thought were friends … Continue reading

Geography and Conversations About Race: a review of Reni Eddo-Lodge’s “Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People About Race”
Book Reviews / British / feminism / nonfiction / Opinion Pieces / The Latest

Geography and Conversations About Race: a review of Reni Eddo-Lodge’s “Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People About Race”


Talking about race is exhausting. It is emotionally draining, stressful, awkward, painful, scary, and sometimes really dangerous. To have a conversation about race, or any hard topics like gender, sexuality, and class, requires a level of vulnerability that demands patience and practice. People from different sides of the spectrum often come to the table with … Continue reading

A Review of “Do No Harm” by Henry Marsh
Book Reviews / British / nonfiction / The Latest

A Review of “Do No Harm” by Henry Marsh


Do No Harm is a medical memoir. Henry Marsh picks tales from his career as a neurosurgeon and shares his failures, successes, frustrations, and hopes. I think that this book is extremely important for our society because it details the frustrations and complications of working in hospitals and brings a human aspect to medicine in … Continue reading

A Review of Kazuo Ishguro’s “Nocturnes”
Book Reviews / British / The Latest

A Review of Kazuo Ishguro’s “Nocturnes”


Kazuo Ishiguro is a writer of many genres: novels, short stories, and screen plays. He is Japanese-British and I think this creates a really interesting combination for his writing style. To me, Ishiguro’s works always feel relaxing. His writing completely calms me and it is almost like I am floating whilst reading his work. And … Continue reading

Are shows like “Made in Chelsea” and “The Only Way is Essex” the modern versions of Anthony Trolllope’s works?
Book Reviews / British / Classic / Opinion Pieces / The Latest

Are shows like “Made in Chelsea” and “The Only Way is Essex” the modern versions of Anthony Trolllope’s works?


Reality T.V. seems to be a love/hate genre. There are those who think that it is completely beneath them and, then the idea of watching rich people fight and argue with each other on Semi-scripted sets ignites peoples passions. The general consensus about reality T.V. though, seems to be that it is vapid, soul-crushing, and … Continue reading

The question of dignity and being a ‘people pleaser’ in Kazuo Ishiguro’s “The Remains of the Day”
Book Reviews / British / The Latest

The question of dignity and being a ‘people pleaser’ in Kazuo Ishiguro’s “The Remains of the Day”


It has already been said that Ishiguro’s novel is a beautiful study of Englishness. The book for me, like all of Ishiguro’s works I have read, is extremely soothing to read. Somehow, Ishiguro has a way with words that not only calms, but also excites the reader. The book spans not only six days of … Continue reading