A Review of “Small Things Like These” by Claire Keegan: a powerful historical fiction about teen pregnancies
Book Reviews / Irish / The Latest

A Review of “Small Things Like These” by Claire Keegan: a powerful historical fiction about teen pregnancies

Keegan is an Irish author who grew up in Ireland but she has also lived in the United States, Wales, and is now back in Ireland. Her writing, like all Irish writing seems to have to beauty and softness about it that I can’t quite explain, but truly love to read. I’ve written about my love of Irish authors a lot on this blog and one of my favourites is Niall Williams’ This is Happiness. You can read my review of Williams’ book here. Continue reading

“True Friends” by Patti Miller: what does it mean to write a memoir about friendships lost and found?
Australian / Book Reviews / nonfiction / The Latest

“True Friends” by Patti Miller: what does it mean to write a memoir about friendships lost and found?

I think everyone experiences the loss of a friendship at some stage in their life, sometimes multiple friendships and the reasons for these losses are vast, complex, and sometimes confusing. It can be as simple as a friend moving to a different state and losing touch. It can be from a fight. And it can also be a slow unwinding that can be anything from ghosting to drifting apart. We have a lot of words to describe romantic love and breakups – we have song after poem, after novel after film about romantic love. Although very little about friendships. Continue reading

What do “The Code Breaker” & “Klara and the Sun”Have In Common?: Two books about the science and the fiction of gene editing
American / audiobooks / Book Reviews / British / nonfiction / The Latest

What do “The Code Breaker” & “Klara and the Sun”Have In Common?: Two books about the science and the fiction of gene editing

These questions are large and complex and cannot easily be answered, but I loved that Isaacson, like Ishiguro, asks us to address and think about these questions. It seems that many can agree that there is a possibility for gene editing to be used for the good of humanity, but where should we draw the line? Continue reading

A Review of Craig Silvey’s “Honeybee”: an Australian novel about queer and trans life and learning to love who we are
Australian / Book Reviews / queer / The Latest

A Review of Craig Silvey’s “Honeybee”: an Australian novel about queer and trans life and learning to love who we are

The kind of home environment that Victoria grew up in is not really conducive to stability, safety, or love. Of course, there are close relationships, and I don’t doubt that Victoria doesn’t love her mother – but the relationship is also extremely toxic. Victoria is the child, yet she is always expected to be the parent and caregiver for her mother. Treating children like they are adults (in this particular way) is a form of trauma that doesn’t go away easily. Continue reading

15 Black Feminist Books to Read After “The Love Songs of W.E.B. Du Bois” by Honorée Fanonne Jeffers
African / American / Australian / Book Reviews / feminism / The Latest

15 Black Feminist Books to Read After “The Love Songs of W.E.B. Du Bois” by Honorée Fanonne Jeffers

This post may contain affiliate links. If you purchase something through one of these links, I might make a very small commission. This helps me directly fund my blog. It is no secret around here that I absolutely loved Honorée Fanonne Jeffers’s novel The Love Songs of W.E.B. Du Bois. It was just such a … Continue reading

8 Ways to Help Someone Who is Grieving
Book Reviews / nonfiction / Opinion Pieces / The Latest

8 Ways to Help Someone Who is Grieving

This post contains affiliate links. If you purchase something through one of these links, I might make a small commission from the sale. This helps me directly fund this blog. I write this from someone who has lost a father at age 24 and a brother at 34. I write this as someone who has … Continue reading

Lizzie the grateful servant in “The Dictionary of Lost Words”: why do authors keep getting class horribly wrong?
Australian / Book Reviews / British / historical / The Latest

Lizzie the grateful servant in “The Dictionary of Lost Words”: why do authors keep getting class horribly wrong?

On the surface, this all seems good and well. Although, I want to take a closer look at the relationship Esme has with her servant, Lizzie. Esme is motherless, and Lizzie acts in many ways like an older sister and motherly figure all in one. This plot device of women who have lost their mothers and their fathers aren’t great at raising them is a bit tiring and overused for me. Although, I might just read too many books… Continue reading

A Review of Peg Conway’s Memoir “The Art of Reassembly”: grief will always linger
American / Book Reviews / nonfiction / The Latest

A Review of Peg Conway’s Memoir “The Art of Reassembly”: grief will always linger

Note: This audiobook was provided by Books Forward for review purposes. Thank you to the team at Books Forward and the author for sharing their stories with me. This review is my own opinion, and while I was gifted the book to review, I was not paid for anything that I have written here. Disclaimer: … Continue reading

A Review of Anna North’s “Outlawed”: “The Handmaid’s Tale” Meets the Wild Wild West
American / Book Reviews / fantasy / queer / The Latest

A Review of Anna North’s “Outlawed”: “The Handmaid’s Tale” Meets the Wild Wild West

This post contains affiliate links. If you purchase something through these links, I might make a very small commission. This helps me fund my blog. I was drawn to the cover of this book. I know what they say, you shouldn’t judge a book by its cover, but here we are. Outlawed by Anna North … Continue reading