Complicated families and letting go: a review of Sarah Haywood’s “The Cactus”
Book Reviews / British / The Latest

Complicated families and letting go: a review of Sarah Haywood’s “The Cactus”


The Cactus is the debut novel from Sarah Haywood which is about letting go of who people want you to be and who you have made yourself become because of your past experiences. It is about family conflict, death, grief, secrets, and forgiveness. It is not your typical contemporary fiction novel for all the right … Continue reading

Roxane Gay Live at the Open Air Literatur Festival in Zurich 2019
African / American / Book Reviews / feminism / Haitian / Opinion Pieces / reading / The Latest

Roxane Gay Live at the Open Air Literatur Festival in Zurich 2019


Roxane Gay’s work has been seminal for feminist and fat liberation movements around the world. She draws on her own experiences about trauma, body image, feminist ideals, and Haitian and Black identity. Seeing her talk about her two most popular books Bad Feminist and Hunger: A memoir of (My) Body. I used Gay’s feminist text … Continue reading

Stepping outside your comfort zone with “Britt-Marie Was Here”: a review of Fredrik Backman’s novel
Book Reviews / swedish / The Latest

Stepping outside your comfort zone with “Britt-Marie Was Here”: a review of Fredrik Backman’s novel


Swedish author Fredrik Backman has become quite the buzz-worthy author of late with his books appearing all over my bookish social media feeds. His first novel, A Man Called Ove became extremely popular and soon after that his books have become a worldwide hit. I decided to pick Britt-Marie Was Here as my first Backman … Continue reading

“Pride & Prejudice & Passports”: a review of Corrie Garrett’s immigrant retelling of Jane Austen’s classic
American / The Latest / YA

“Pride & Prejudice & Passports”: a review of Corrie Garrett’s immigrant retelling of Jane Austen’s classic


I’ve read some modern re-tellings of classics that have just fallen flat. Sometimes classics are named classics because they are indeed just that: stories that transcend time. They shape our culture and understanding of the past. They also help us shape our future and in particular the way authors and readers write and engage with … Continue reading

“This Is Going To Hurt”: a review of Adam Kay’s hilarious medical memoir
Book Reviews / British / comedy / nonfiction / The Latest

“This Is Going To Hurt”: a review of Adam Kay’s hilarious medical memoir


Bound2Books is no stranger to medical memoirs. I love reading books about the living and the dead and everything in between. If I can combine medicine with comedy, then we have a real winner on our hands which is the case for Adam Kay’s memoir/diary This Is Going to Hurt: Secret Diaries of a Junior … Continue reading

“Is There Still Sex In The City?”: A Review on love, lust, and life in the Big Apple
American / Book Reviews / nonfiction / The Latest

“Is There Still Sex In The City?”: A Review on love, lust, and life in the Big Apple


Is There Still Sex In The City? by Candace Bushnell is an exploration of love, lust, and digital dating after 50. How should older women, and men for that matter, navigate single life in a world that has vastly changed since they last dated. As more and more couples split, especially later on in life, … Continue reading

The Best and Worst of Celebrity Memoirs
African / American / Book Reviews / chicano / comedy / nonfiction / South African / The Latest

The Best and Worst of Celebrity Memoirs


In the last decade, there has been an explosion of celebrities writing memoirs and autobiographies. Within this celebrity genre, comedians and comedic actors and actresses are some of the most published. This is probably due to their ability to entertain and make people laugh. I, like many others, have been drawn to these memoirs and … Continue reading