“Sanctuary Somewhere”: a review of Brenna Dimmig’s poetry cycle on immigration
American / Book Reviews / poetry / The Latest / YA

“Sanctuary Somewhere”: a review of Brenna Dimmig’s poetry cycle on immigration


Brenna Dimmig’s poetry collection Sanctuary Somewhere is centred on undocumented immigration experiences in the U.S. Her two main characters, Osmel and Leslie experience the U.S. differently based on their immigration statuses. Despite being siblings, Leslie is legal because she is born in the U.S. but her brother, Osmel, and her mother are undocumented. The fear … Continue reading

A review of “My Friend Anna”: the seduction of money
American / Book Reviews / nonfiction / The Latest

A review of “My Friend Anna”: the seduction of money


Disclosure: This page may contain affiliate links. Clicking through for additional information or to make a purchase may result in a small commission. My Friend Anna has been one of the most unsettling memoirs that I have read recently. It made me think not only about friendships and close personal relationships, but also how money … Continue reading

Review of “Crises of Democracy”: Can we predict the fall of democratic institutions?
American / historical / nonfiction / The Latest

Review of “Crises of Democracy”: Can we predict the fall of democratic institutions?


Disclosure: This page may contain affiliate links. Clicking through for additional information or to make a purchase may result in a small commission. Crises of Democracy written by Professor of Politics, Adam Przeworski could not have been written at a more critical moment in our contemporary political climate. All around the world, it seems that … Continue reading

“Anxiety: the missing stage of Grief”: a review and personal exploration of Claire Bidwell-Smith’s grief self-help book
American / Book Reviews / nonfiction / The Latest

“Anxiety: the missing stage of Grief”: a review and personal exploration of Claire Bidwell-Smith’s grief self-help book


Disclosure: This page may contain affiliate links. Clicking through for additional information or to make a purchase may result in a small commission. When my father died in 2011, my whole world was flipped on its head. I have spent most of my 20s coming to terms with death, loss, and grief, and this is … Continue reading

“Running with Scissors”: a review of Augusten Burroughs’ memoir
American / Book Reviews / nonfiction / The Latest

“Running with Scissors”: a review of Augusten Burroughs’ memoir


Disclosure: This page may contain affiliate links. Clicking through for additional information or to make a purchase may result in a small commission. Running with Scissors is one of those books that I have wanted to read for such a long time, but somehow never managed to find the book at the right moment. When … Continue reading

Roxane Gay Live at the Open Air Literatur Festival in Zurich 2019
African / American / Book Reviews / feminism / Haitian / Opinion Pieces / reading / The Latest

Roxane Gay Live at the Open Air Literatur Festival in Zurich 2019


Roxane Gay’s work has been seminal for feminist and fat liberation movements around the world. She draws on her own experiences about trauma, body image, feminist ideals, and Haitian and Black identity. Seeing her talk about her two most popular books Bad Feminist and Hunger: A memoir of (My) Body. I used Gay’s feminist text … Continue reading

5 Life Lessons from Amy Poehler’s “Yes, Please”
American / Book Reviews / feminism / nonfiction / The Latest

5 Life Lessons from Amy Poehler’s “Yes, Please”


Disclosure: This page may contain affiliate links. Clicking through for additional information or to make a purchase may result in a small commission. Most people know Amy Poehler as the hilarious comedy queen and beloved friend of Tina Fey. Her career achievements are too long to add here, but let’s just be clear that she … Continue reading

“Pride & Prejudice & Passports”: a review of Corrie Garrett’s immigrant retelling of Jane Austen’s classic
American / The Latest / YA

“Pride & Prejudice & Passports”: a review of Corrie Garrett’s immigrant retelling of Jane Austen’s classic


I’ve read some modern re-tellings of classics that have just fallen flat. Sometimes classics are named classics because they are indeed just that: stories that transcend time. They shape our culture and understanding of the past. They also help us shape our future and in particular the way authors and readers write and engage with … Continue reading